onefootinthegrave:

WHY DO YOU EVEN HAVE AN IGNORE FUNCTION? fuck. this shit makes me want to text and drive off a cliff.

I’d complain to tumblr, but they’ve proven they don’t listen to any of us anyway so whatever blah blah blah blah search function missing-e here’s a blog bullshittery ugh I want to vomit.

onefootinthegrave:

WHY DO YOU EVEN HAVE AN IGNORE FUNCTION? fuck. this shit makes me want to text and drive off a cliff.

I’d complain to tumblr, but they’ve proven they don’t listen to any of us anyway so whatever blah blah blah blah search function missing-e here’s a blog bullshittery ugh I want to vomit.

HOW DOES ONE EXPORT ONE’S OWN TUMBLR CONTENT?

I know about the now-defunct Apple app. What other options exist now, post-yahoo shenanigans?

EDIT: check the answers here for a link from the ever-friendly davidkendall that covers the tumblr-to-WordPress process

nedhepburn:

coketalk:

This is the email I woke up to. Terrifying.
Honestly, I don’t know what to do at this point. Within ten minutes of sounding the alarm via Twitter, my account had been restored, but I’m one of the lucky ones. I have the privilege of asking tens of thousands of people to write into Tumblr on my behalf, and I can only imagine how helpless someone might feel who woke up to the same letter with no way to do anything about it.
I went back and searched through my old email address. Sure enough, under the “Social” tab of a gmail account that I never use anymore were a handful of Tumblr DMCA notices, all originating from some sniveling cunt stain named Jeremy Banks of the IFPI. I saw none of the notices until this morning, not that it would have mattered, because they were all for songs that I posted years ago.
I’ve been posting music for over half a damn decade. I have no idea what songs Jeremy Banks is suddenly going to give a shit about. Short of deleting every song I’ve ever posted, there’s nothing I can do to retroactively protect myself from this kind of arbitrary account termination.
Shit, we all post music. We all click the little box. We all know damn well that we don’t own the copyright, but we do it anyway. We’re not stealing. We’re not making money off the backs of musicians. We’re sharing our favorite songs with our friends.
God damn, I’m still shaking from all the adrenaline. I’m genuinely upset right now. People are suggesting that I export my blogs and migrate to independent hosting, but I don’t want to have to do that.
I love Tumblr. I love the community it fosters. I love my dashboard full of people I follow, and I love the interactions I have with all the people who follow me. I don’t want to leave Tumblr, but I don’t want to be so beholden to the whims of some DMCA termination robot either.
At the very least, I need to find a way to separate and protect Dear Coquette and my other blogs where I’ve never posted any music.
Ugh. This is not good. This is not good at all.

Tumblr is handling this appallingly. 

HOW. THE FUCK. CAN WE. BACK UP. OUR TUMBLRS??!!??!!
Pretty please. Tumblr. Yahoo. Please. It is asinine that this isn’t an obvious option.

nedhepburn:

coketalk:

This is the email I woke up to. Terrifying.

Honestly, I don’t know what to do at this point. Within ten minutes of sounding the alarm via Twitter, my account had been restored, but I’m one of the lucky ones. I have the privilege of asking tens of thousands of people to write into Tumblr on my behalf, and I can only imagine how helpless someone might feel who woke up to the same letter with no way to do anything about it.

I went back and searched through my old email address. Sure enough, under the “Social” tab of a gmail account that I never use anymore were a handful of Tumblr DMCA notices, all originating from some sniveling cunt stain named Jeremy Banks of the IFPI. I saw none of the notices until this morning, not that it would have mattered, because they were all for songs that I posted years ago.

I’ve been posting music for over half a damn decade. I have no idea what songs Jeremy Banks is suddenly going to give a shit about. Short of deleting every song I’ve ever posted, there’s nothing I can do to retroactively protect myself from this kind of arbitrary account termination.

Shit, we all post music. We all click the little box. We all know damn well that we don’t own the copyright, but we do it anyway. We’re not stealing. We’re not making money off the backs of musicians. We’re sharing our favorite songs with our friends.

God damn, I’m still shaking from all the adrenaline. I’m genuinely upset right now. People are suggesting that I export my blogs and migrate to independent hosting, but I don’t want to have to do that.

I love Tumblr. I love the community it fosters. I love my dashboard full of people I follow, and I love the interactions I have with all the people who follow me. I don’t want to leave Tumblr, but I don’t want to be so beholden to the whims of some DMCA termination robot either.

At the very least, I need to find a way to separate and protect Dear Coquette and my other blogs where I’ve never posted any music.

Ugh. This is not good. This is not good at all.

Tumblr is handling this appallingly. 

HOW. THE FUCK. CAN WE. BACK UP. OUR TUMBLRS??!!??!!

Pretty please. Tumblr. Yahoo. Please. It is asinine that this isn’t an obvious option.

Source: coketalk

alexlikesdesign:

Spec work being a hot button issue in our community recently afforded Dan Cassaro a swell of support when he publicly turned down Showtime’s offer of unpaid work. But despite the growing backlash against accepting projects without compensation, designers are content to remain silent about clients who refuse or systematically stall payment after a project is completed. While it remains important for members of our community to reject spec work invitations, we must also warn one another of those who leave contracts unfulfilled, turning what was legitimate work into a form of unpaid spec work.With that said, the potential for this post to be misconstrued as bitter or angry is nearly infinite, and I’m afraid future partnerships may be jeopardized by writing it. However, after talking it over with multiple colleagues and researching similar scenarios, I’ve decided at the end of the day, I have to do what I feel is right.If you are a designer or illustrator, I would advise against working with Tumblr.I have been, and continue to be, an ardent supporter of their platform, having personally hosted Games Designed, Future 52, and my own blog on Tumblr for years. When they contacted me in January, I was ecstatic to work with them on their collaboration with Axe and Yahoo! Sports to celebrate the Super Bowl. However, that excitement has given way to exasperation in the seven months since that I have gone unpaid. I won’t quote any dialogue with tumblr’s employees, as I acknowledge and respect that our conversations were had in confidence. Furthermore, I just want to say that I don’t hold any ill-will toward the employees that I’ve spoken with, as I believe they have had nothing but good intentions. The problem lies not with them, but with the broken system they are working within. That said, here is a brief summation of the events that have transpired:• Today is August 26th. My original invoice is 136 days past due.• My wife (who handles my invoicing) and I have exchanged 49 emails with five different tumblr employees over a period of six months.• I have received four different payment timelines, ranging from “This week” in March,  to “Within a 60 day period” in July. Last week, a PO was issued, which should guarantee me payment within the next 60 days.• I have submitted two invoices and I have signed up as a Yahoo! vendor twice.• Tumblr employees have apologized 10 times for the delayed payment.• Tumblr sent me a very nice thank you card when the project was wrapped. (I’m not being sarcastic of facetious, it was very thoughtful of them and I wish more clients sent follow-up cards like that.)After six months of back and forth, in an attempt to find a contact within the company that might help me navigate the labyrinth, I reached out to a number of other freelancers who have worked with Tumblr. Of the six contacted, four have also gone unpaid for a considerable amount of time. All, including those who were eventually paid, experienced the same difficulties my wife and I have been wading through for months. This is what propelled me to write this post.Make no mistake: Tumblr’s service has allowed clients to discover my work, helped me find new projects and offered me the chance to share my output with thousands. It’s for these reasons that I love Tumblr and am also incredibly disheartened by the professional disrespect my colleagues and I have received from them. They should not be asking for work from artists if there is no infrastructure in place to pay them within a reasonable period of time.This issue is something Tumblr needs to address internally; a company that values art and the creative community should be prioritizing compensation and the respectful treatment of the people it works with. In the mean time, I encourage the creative community to be more open with one another about clients that leave invoices unpaid, and avoid those clients that act in such a manner. If we don’t respect ourselves, how can we ask for respect from our clients?By Alex Griendling / Blog / Twitter

Signal boost.
I mean, wow.

alexlikesdesign:

Spec work being a hot button issue in our community recently afforded Dan Cassaro a swell of support when he publicly turned down Showtime’s offer of unpaid work. But despite the growing backlash against accepting projects without compensation, designers are content to remain silent about clients who refuse or systematically stall payment after a project is completed. While it remains important for members of our community to reject spec work invitations, we must also warn one another of those who leave contracts unfulfilled, turning what was legitimate work into a form of unpaid spec work.

With that said, the potential for this post to be misconstrued as bitter or angry is nearly infinite, and I’m afraid future partnerships may be jeopardized by writing it. However, after talking it over with multiple colleagues and researching similar scenarios, I’ve decided at the end of the day, I have to do what I feel is right.

If you are a designer or illustrator, I would advise against working with Tumblr.

I have been, and continue to be, an ardent supporter of their platform, having personally hosted Games Designed, Future 52, and my own blog on Tumblr for years. When they contacted me in January, I was ecstatic to work with them on their collaboration with Axe and Yahoo! Sports to celebrate the Super Bowl. However, that excitement has given way to exasperation in the seven months since that I have gone unpaid. I won’t quote any dialogue with tumblr’s employees, as I acknowledge and respect that our conversations were had in confidence. Furthermore, I just want to say that I don’t hold any ill-will toward the employees that I’ve spoken with, as I believe they have had nothing but good intentions. The problem lies not with them, but with the broken system they are working within. That said, here is a brief summation of the events that have transpired:

• Today is August 26th. My original invoice is 136 days past due.

• My wife (who handles my invoicing) and I have exchanged 49 emails with five different tumblr employees over a period of six months.

• I have received four different payment timelines, ranging from “This week” in March,  to “Within a 60 day period” in July. Last week, a PO was issued, which should guarantee me payment within the next 60 days.

• I have submitted two invoices and I have signed up as a Yahoo! vendor twice.

• Tumblr employees have apologized 10 times for the delayed payment.

• Tumblr sent me a very nice thank you card when the project was wrapped. (I’m not being sarcastic of facetious, it was very thoughtful of them and I wish more clients sent follow-up cards like that.)

After six months of back and forth, in an attempt to find a contact within the company that might help me navigate the labyrinth, I reached out to a number of other freelancers who have worked with Tumblr. Of the six contacted, four have also gone unpaid for a considerable amount of time. All, including those who were eventually paid, experienced the same difficulties my wife and I have been wading through for months. This is what propelled me to write this post.

Make no mistake: Tumblr’s service has allowed clients to discover my work, helped me find new projects and offered me the chance to share my output with thousands. It’s for these reasons that I love Tumblr and am also incredibly disheartened by the professional disrespect my colleagues and I have received from them. They should not be asking for work from artists if there is no infrastructure in place to pay them within a reasonable period of time.

This issue is something Tumblr needs to address internally; a company that values art and the creative community should be prioritizing compensation and the respectful treatment of the people it works with. In the mean time, I encourage the creative community to be more open with one another about clients that leave invoices unpaid, and avoid those clients that act in such a manner. If we don’t respect ourselves, how can we ask for respect from our clients?

By Alex Griendling / Blog / Twitter

Signal boost.

I mean, wow.

Oh just burn it all down why don’t you ugh.

Oh just burn it all down why don’t you ugh.

staff:

It’s been almost two years since we last updated Tumblr’s terms and policies. A lot has happened since then!

To make sure these documents fully reflect our product and philosophies, and are as understandable and up-to-date as they can be, our Legal and Policy teams have taken the last few weeks (and a tremendous amount of care) to update our Terms of Service, Privacy Policy, and Community Guidelines.

There are a fair number of changes, so we insist you read them all for yourself. Some notable updates include:

  • Cleanup to make all of the documents more readable
  • Updates to reflect changes to our products over the last two years
  • Information about how we work with our new parent company, Yahoo
  • Credits for open source projects
  • Some language that makes it easier for U.S. government organizations to blog on Tumblr
  • An attribution policy reminding people not to be jerks
  • Updated annotations (!)

You can review the drafts via the links above. You can also see every change, letter for letter, on GitHub (minus the plain English annotations).

We’re planning to officially launch the new terms soon and we’d really love to hear any questions or concerns. Please write to policy@tumblr.com.

I look forward to the attribution policy being vigorously applied to even internet superstars like George Takei.

[previously]

kateoplis:

nevver:

Is it Frida yet?

I feel very strongly about this, so here it goes again. 
This line was not written by Frida. It is from a hauntingly gorgeous poem by the very talented living poet, Marty McConnell. More on that later.
When Nevver/Thisisnthappiness was approached about this on Twitter, he shrugged it off and deferred to DesignCrush who created it. His erroneous post remains up, with almost 3,000 notes.
After DesignCrush was notified on Twitter & Instagram, she “updated” it by a mere comment in the bottom of its Instagram comment section. The post is still up as is, and she seems satisfied that she has done her part in correcting the issue. 
Do you think that’s enough? On sites like Nevver where he actually makes $$$ off of advertising on TUMBLR? 
If this was a case of attributing a quote to Lincoln instead of Whitman, I might shrug it off as ‘oh, you crazy internets’. But this is a case of attributing a quote to a dead celebrity, instead of a living, breathing, struggling poet. Even AFTER you’ve been notified that this is the case. 
These folks are not green new bloggers. We’re talking about professionals who make their living on the backs of artists. 
I don’t pick up the torch every single time I see it on my screen (who has time & energy for that?!), but on occasions like this, I have no choice. I will implode otherwise.
Reblog this. Follow Marty McConnell here.

What Kateoplis said.

kateoplis:

nevver:

Is it Frida yet?

I feel very strongly about this, so here it goes again

This line was not written by Frida. It is from a hauntingly gorgeous poem by the very talented living poet, Marty McConnell. More on that later.

When Nevver/Thisisnthappiness was approached about this on Twitter, he shrugged it off and deferred to DesignCrush who created it. His erroneous post remains up, with almost 3,000 notes.

After DesignCrush was notified on Twitter & Instagram, she “updated” it by a mere comment in the bottom of its Instagram comment section. The post is still up as is, and she seems satisfied that she has done her part in correcting the issue. 

Do you think that’s enough? On sites like Nevver where he actually makes $$$ off of advertising on TUMBLR? 

If this was a case of attributing a quote to Lincoln instead of Whitman, I might shrug it off as ‘oh, you crazy internets’. But this is a case of attributing a quote to a dead celebrity, instead of a living, breathing, struggling poet. Even AFTER you’ve been notified that this is the case. 

These folks are not green new bloggers. We’re talking about professionals who make their living on the backs of artists. 

I don’t pick up the torch every single time I see it on my screen (who has time & energy for that?!), but on occasions like this, I have no choice. I will implode otherwise.

Reblog this. Follow Marty McConnell here.

What Kateoplis said.

Tumblr Edit Woes

azspot:

Still unable to edit Tumblr posts from my work machine. 

For a long while, any attempt to save (whether it be immediate publish action, save to draft, save to queue) was greeted with a Something went wrong error message.

Then, last week, the error message morphed into one word — Forbidden.

But now, over the course of the past few (work)days, any attempt to save a post just results in an infinite progress indicator spinner. :(

It seems with the passage of time, Tumblr snafus remain unfixed for ever increasing bouts. And the edit function from the Dashboard is a travesty in itself, a dreadful blowback against what once was the elegance and simplicity of composing a Tumblr post. Then toss in the Tumblr Bookmarklet (what I am using to compose this post, launched from an empty Chrome panel) alteration last year that stripped Markdown away (and putting this “edit” function totally at odds with the Tumblr Dashboard “edit” process), and it’s more grist for contemplating abandoning the platform.

Yes. Yes yes.

I’m certainly looking for options lately.

I really want something as simple as the Bookmarklet, though… I post just about everything during the day through that little button.

And I really really would love to find a quality way to export all of my writing here over the past 6 years to some sort of local archive… any ideas? Anyone? Bueller? Is there anyone left here?!