thakate:

Peeking over the table in hopes for some breakfast scraps. #ada #boxerlove

thakate:

Peeking over the table in hopes for some breakfast scraps. #ada #boxerlove

fer1972:

Paintings by Francesco Garieri 

Field Report - Home (Leave the Lights On)

I am completely in love with Field Report’s sophomore album (due out Oct. 7 on Partisan Records). This isn’t even my favorite song on the record.

More beautiful music from Wisconsin.

On what I’ve “admitted”

lessig:

It’s kind of terrifying to watch the spin around this Brown story. Further down you can read the post I made about Scott Brown’s nastygram. In it I said this: 

So yes, according to the Senate, Scott Brown isn’t a “lobbyist.” But I submit to anyone else in the world, a former Senator joining a “law and lobbying firm” to help with Wall St’s “business and governmental affairs” is to make him a lobbyist. 

This quote is now being use to state that I’ve admitted the statement is a “lie.” 

Wow. 

So here’s the blog post where I insist that the honest reader admit that I have “admitted” no such thing. 

What I’ve said is this: According the ordinary way in which people understand the term, selling your influence to affect “business and governmental affairs” within government is lobbying. It is so even if it is not how the Senate’s rules define it. Ketchup is not a vegetable, even if Congress says it is. What Brown did is lobbying, even if Congress says it isn’t. 

So I don’t view the mailer created for our campaign as wrong, or as a “lie.” Instead, I view the whole idea that the Brown campaign wants to have an argument about whether the level of influence peddling that Brown has admitted to constitutes “lobbying” as just bizarre. Truly, absolutely bizarre. 

It is not that we have a short time to live, but that we waste a lot of it. Life is long enough, and a sufficiently generous amount has been given to us for the highest achievements if it were all well invested. But when it is wasted in heedless luxury and spent on no good activity, we are forced at last by death’s final constraint to realize that it has passed away before we knew it was passing. So it is: we are not given a short life but we make it short, and we are not ill-supplied but wasteful of it… Life is long if you know how to use it.
Seneca (via azspot)

thosenerdyfeels:

beeishappy:

Stephen Colbert on Late Night with Seth Meyers

image

TCR | 2007.03.12 | It reads: “Dear Stephen, As editor-in-chief of Marvel, I am burdened with the handling of our character’s estates and the sad event that a hero should perish before his time. Captain America’s will was read last Friday, and while heavy hearted, I am proud to announce the star spangled Avenger has bequeathed his most valuable possession, his indestructible shield, to the only man he believed had the red, white, and blue balls to carry the mantle. Stephen Colbert. Welcome to the Marvel Universe. Sincerely, Joe Quesada.

How can you but just love this?

Seriously.

Source: beeishappy

Go home Google, you are drunk.

Go home Google, you are drunk.

Kate’s enduring a classroom full of douchebros this semester.
And I do truly abhor the cult of crossfit.

Kate’s enduring a classroom full of douchebros this semester.

And I do truly abhor the cult of crossfit.

Hand drawn monster art on Post-It Notes. They’re all pretty amazing, click through for more. (via tickld)

Hand drawn monster art on Post-It Notes. They’re all pretty amazing, click through for more. (via tickld)

Source: tickld.com

altidude:

projecthabu:

     On July 4th, 2014, I photographed A-12 #06938, on display at the USS Alabama Museum in Mobile, Alabama. Even though I’ve photographed #06938 numerous times, I always attempt to create fresh, interesting photos. This time, I photographed the two the liquid nitrogen tanks in the nose gear bay, shown in the final photo. The liquid nitrogen was stored in these tanks, converted into gaseous nitrogen, and used to inert the atmosphere in the aircraft’s fuel tanks. This inert nitrogen atmosphere was required, because the fuel heated 350° Fahrenheit inside the tank during flight. At that temperature, an ambient air environment could have caused combustion inside the fuel tank. If the nitrogen environment could not be achieved during flight, there was a danger of combustion inside the fuel tank.

     The Blackbird aircraft has what we call “wet wings”, which means that the skin panels of the wings and fuselage double as a fuel tank. There is no bladder inside the aircraft to hold the fuel, and every joint and screw has to be sealed from the inside, to prevent fuel leakage. When the aircraft flew at full speed, Mach 3.2, the compression of the air against the surface of the aircraft would cause serious heating, up to 620° Fahrenheit in some places. This heating would cause the entire length of the aircraft to grow about five inches in flight.

     When the aircraft would constantly contract and expand, it would cause the sealant in the fuel tanks to wear out, and fuel leaks would take place. These leaks were monitored by maintenance crews, measuring them in drips per minute (DPM). If the DPM reached its tolerance in a certain area, maintenance crews would go inside the fuel tanks, and reseal the area, which was a nightmarish process.

     Nearly every time I photograph a Blackbird in a museum, I hear a museum guest mistakenly saying, “The Blackbird had to refuel mid-air immediately after takeoff, because it leaked so badly.” This is not true. The real reason they refueled after takeoff was, when the Blackbird was fueled on the ground, the atmosphere inside the tank was ambient air. This had to be replaced with gaseous nitrogen before they reached full speed. When the tanker aircraft topped off the Blackbird’s tanks, all of the ambient air would be expelled from the tanks through relief valves. Then, as the aircraft consumed fuel, the space created in the fuel tanks would be replaced with gaseous nitrogen. This created a safe, inert atmosphere in the fuel tanks. If the aircraft, for some reason, could not create this 100% nitrogen atmosphere, the flight could not exceed 2.6 Mach. 

     It was possible to fully fuel, then defuel the aircraft to a partial load on the ground, before flight, to create this inert nitrogen tank environment, but this was a maintenance nightmare. This procedure was called a “maintenance yo-yo.” When you put the gaseous nitrogen head pressure in the fuel tanks on the ground, it caused excessive leaking, so maintenance always preferred to perform this procedure in the air, after takeoff.

I’ve read a lot about the A-12 and SR-71 program but had never seen these details about the legendary fuel leakage and heating issues. Amazing stuff.

This heating would cause the entire length of the aircraft to grow about five inches in flight.”

Whaaaa?!!

Source: projecthabu