think-progress:

Rams’ Chris Long tweets the perfect response to ESPN’s report on Mike Sam’s showers.

think-progress:

Rams’ Chris Long tweets the perfect response to ESPN’s report on Mike Sam’s showers.

Source: pynter

radiomilwaukee:

Discover New Music: Vaults

Love this.

aatombomb:

micdotcom:

“I’m not racist — I have Black friends!” No, you don’t

 It’s not uncommon for white people to deflect accusations of racism with the cry, “I’m not racist – I have black friends!”
Yet according to new data, “friends” is an overstatement. Christopher Ingraham of the Washington Post has assembled a graph illustrating how many black friends the average white American actually has, citing research from Robert P. Jones of the Public Religion Research Institute.
This may be due to “self segregation” or … actual segregation | Follow micdotcom


Who the fuck has over a hundred friends of any color? Facebook has completely demented our concept of friendship. 
I have about ten good friends. Equally divided between male, female, black, white, asian, hispanic and native american. (I know, your award’s in the mail, you pompous prick.)
If you have more “friends” than that, you’re lying. Either to us or to yourself. 

aatombomb:

micdotcom:

“I’m not racist — I have Black friends!” No, you don’t

 It’s not uncommon for white people to deflect accusations of racism with the cry, “I’m not racist – I have black friends!”

Yet according to new data, “friends” is an overstatement. Christopher Ingraham of the Washington Post has assembled a graph illustrating how many black friends the average white American actually has, citing research from Robert P. Jones of the Public Religion Research Institute.

This may be due to “self segregation” or … actual segregation | Follow micdotcom

Who the fuck has over a hundred friends of any color? Facebook has completely demented our concept of friendship. 

I have about ten good friends. Equally divided between male, female, black, white, asian, hispanic and native american. (I know, your award’s in the mail, you pompous prick.)

If you have more “friends” than that, you’re lying. Either to us or to yourself. 

Source: micdotcom

alexlikesdesign:

Spec work being a hot button issue in our community recently afforded Dan Cassaro a swell of support when he publicly turned down Showtime’s offer of unpaid work. But despite the growing backlash against accepting projects without compensation, designers are content to remain silent about clients who refuse or systematically stall payment after a project is completed. While it remains important for members of our community to reject spec work invitations, we must also warn one another of those who leave contracts unfulfilled, turning what was legitimate work into a form of unpaid spec work.With that said, the potential for this post to be misconstrued as bitter or angry is nearly infinite, and I’m afraid future partnerships may be jeopardized by writing it. However, after talking it over with multiple colleagues and researching similar scenarios, I’ve decided at the end of the day, I have to do what I feel is right.If you are a designer or illustrator, I would advise against working with Tumblr.I have been, and continue to be, an ardent supporter of their platform, having personally hosted Games Designed, Future 52, and my own blog on Tumblr for years. When they contacted me in January, I was ecstatic to work with them on their collaboration with Axe and Yahoo! Sports to celebrate the Super Bowl. However, that excitement has given way to exasperation in the seven months since that I have gone unpaid. I won’t quote any dialogue with tumblr’s employees, as I acknowledge and respect that our conversations were had in confidence. Furthermore, I just want to say that I don’t hold any ill-will toward the employees that I’ve spoken with, as I believe they have had nothing but good intentions. The problem lies not with them, but with the broken system they are working within. That said, here is a brief summation of the events that have transpired:• Today is August 26th. My original invoice is 136 days past due.• My wife (who handles my invoicing) and I have exchanged 49 emails with five different tumblr employees over a period of six months.• I have received four different payment timelines, ranging from “This week” in March,  to “Within a 60 day period” in July. Last week, a PO was issued, which should guarantee me payment within the next 60 days.• I have submitted two invoices and I have signed up as a Yahoo! vendor twice.• Tumblr employees have apologized 10 times for the delayed payment.• Tumblr sent me a very nice thank you card when the project was wrapped. (I’m not being sarcastic of facetious, it was very thoughtful of them and I wish more clients sent follow-up cards like that.)After six months of back and forth, in an attempt to find a contact within the company that might help me navigate the labyrinth, I reached out to a number of other freelancers who have worked with Tumblr. Of the six contacted, four have also gone unpaid for a considerable amount of time. All, including those who were eventually paid, experienced the same difficulties my wife and I have been wading through for months. This is what propelled me to write this post.Make no mistake: Tumblr’s service has allowed clients to discover my work, helped me find new projects and offered me the chance to share my output with thousands. It’s for these reasons that I love Tumblr and am also incredibly disheartened by the professional disrespect my colleagues and I have received from them. They should not be asking for work from artists if there is no infrastructure in place to pay them within a reasonable period of time.This issue is something Tumblr needs to address internally; a company that values art and the creative community should be prioritizing compensation and the respectful treatment of the people it works with. In the mean time, I encourage the creative community to be more open with one another about clients that leave invoices unpaid, and avoid those clients that act in such a manner. If we don’t respect ourselves, how can we ask for respect from our clients?By Alex Griendling / Blog / Twitter

Signal boost.
I mean, wow.

alexlikesdesign:

Spec work being a hot button issue in our community recently afforded Dan Cassaro a swell of support when he publicly turned down Showtime’s offer of unpaid work. But despite the growing backlash against accepting projects without compensation, designers are content to remain silent about clients who refuse or systematically stall payment after a project is completed. While it remains important for members of our community to reject spec work invitations, we must also warn one another of those who leave contracts unfulfilled, turning what was legitimate work into a form of unpaid spec work.

With that said, the potential for this post to be misconstrued as bitter or angry is nearly infinite, and I’m afraid future partnerships may be jeopardized by writing it. However, after talking it over with multiple colleagues and researching similar scenarios, I’ve decided at the end of the day, I have to do what I feel is right.

If you are a designer or illustrator, I would advise against working with Tumblr.

I have been, and continue to be, an ardent supporter of their platform, having personally hosted Games Designed, Future 52, and my own blog on Tumblr for years. When they contacted me in January, I was ecstatic to work with them on their collaboration with Axe and Yahoo! Sports to celebrate the Super Bowl. However, that excitement has given way to exasperation in the seven months since that I have gone unpaid. I won’t quote any dialogue with tumblr’s employees, as I acknowledge and respect that our conversations were had in confidence. Furthermore, I just want to say that I don’t hold any ill-will toward the employees that I’ve spoken with, as I believe they have had nothing but good intentions. The problem lies not with them, but with the broken system they are working within. That said, here is a brief summation of the events that have transpired:

• Today is August 26th. My original invoice is 136 days past due.

• My wife (who handles my invoicing) and I have exchanged 49 emails with five different tumblr employees over a period of six months.

• I have received four different payment timelines, ranging from “This week” in March,  to “Within a 60 day period” in July. Last week, a PO was issued, which should guarantee me payment within the next 60 days.

• I have submitted two invoices and I have signed up as a Yahoo! vendor twice.

• Tumblr employees have apologized 10 times for the delayed payment.

• Tumblr sent me a very nice thank you card when the project was wrapped. (I’m not being sarcastic of facetious, it was very thoughtful of them and I wish more clients sent follow-up cards like that.)

After six months of back and forth, in an attempt to find a contact within the company that might help me navigate the labyrinth, I reached out to a number of other freelancers who have worked with Tumblr. Of the six contacted, four have also gone unpaid for a considerable amount of time. All, including those who were eventually paid, experienced the same difficulties my wife and I have been wading through for months. This is what propelled me to write this post.

Make no mistake: Tumblr’s service has allowed clients to discover my work, helped me find new projects and offered me the chance to share my output with thousands. It’s for these reasons that I love Tumblr and am also incredibly disheartened by the professional disrespect my colleagues and I have received from them. They should not be asking for work from artists if there is no infrastructure in place to pay them within a reasonable period of time.

This issue is something Tumblr needs to address internally; a company that values art and the creative community should be prioritizing compensation and the respectful treatment of the people it works with. In the mean time, I encourage the creative community to be more open with one another about clients that leave invoices unpaid, and avoid those clients that act in such a manner. If we don’t respect ourselves, how can we ask for respect from our clients?

By Alex Griendling / Blog / Twitter

Signal boost.

I mean, wow.

I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief.
Gerry Spence, How to Argue & Win Every Time (via scu)
For the last 9 hours, I have been answering letters from people from all over the world. The anger is off the scale and in my opinion, well placed.

The article I wrote in the LA Weekly about suicide caused a lot of hurt. This is perhaps one of the bigger understatements of all time. I read all the letters. Some of them were very long and the disappointment, resentment and ringing clarity was jarring.

That I hurt anyone by what I said, and I did hurt many, disgusts me. It was not at all my intent but it most certainly was the result.

I have had a life of depression. Some days are excruciating. Knowing what I know and having been through what I have, I should have known better but I obviously did not. I get so mad when I hear that someone has died this way. Not mad at them, mad at whatever got them there and that no one magically appeared to somehow save them.

I am not asking for a break from the caning, take me to the woodshed as much as you see fit. If what I said has caused you to be done with me, I get it.

I wrote something for the LA Weekly that they will post on Monday.

I wanted to get this out at this moment.

I am deeply sorry. Down to my marrow. I can’t think that means anything to you, but I am. Completely sorry. It is not of my interest to hurt anyone but I know I did. Thank you for reading this.
Henry Rollins (via FB) apologizing for this previous comments on Robin Williams and his suicide

Source: facebook.com

Ice bucket videos are the new dudebro trucker hat.

Wake me when it’s over, please.